libraryjournal:

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published
On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.
Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.
Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.
Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

Happy Publication Day!

libraryjournal:

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published

On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.

Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.

Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.

Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

Happy Publication Day!

Put it all in,
Make use.
— From Raymond Carver’s poem Sunday Night.

It’s the summer of 2014. I’m reading Herodotus. Quite frankly, this is a bit of a shock. I never expected I’d live this long.

I wonder what Herodotus would say if he saw me reading his Histories on my iPhone while drinking beer and whiskey. I think he’d be cool with it.

I wonder what Herodotus would say if he saw me reading his Histories on my iPhone while drinking beer and whiskey. I think he’d be cool with it.

vintageanchorbooks:

Happy Bastille Day!“Asked what he thought of the significance of the French Revolution, the Chinese Premier Zhou En-lai is reported to have answered, ‘It’s too soon to tell.’  Two hundred years may still be too soon (or possibly, too late) to tell.”—from CITIZENS: A Chronicle of the French Revolution by Simon SchamaInstead of the dying Old Regime, Schama presents an ebullient country, vital and inventive, infatuated with novelty and technology—a strikingly fresh view of Louis XVI’s France.

vintageanchorbooks:

Happy Bastille Day!

“Asked what he thought of the significance of the French Revolution, the Chinese Premier Zhou En-lai is reported to have answered, ‘It’s too soon to tell.’  Two hundred years may still be too soon (or possibly, too late) to tell.”
—from CITIZENS: A Chronicle of the French Revolution by Simon Schama

Instead of the dying Old Regime, Schama presents an ebullient country, vital and inventive, infatuated with novelty and technology—a strikingly fresh view of Louis XVI’s France.

In an offhanded way, I recommended you read ‘Fever Pitch’ by Nick Hornsby, but I know you won’t do it. However, the original movie adaptation of ‘Fever Pitch’ starring Colin Firth is on Netflix. It’s a slice of life movie with a couple of love stories interwoven.

You should watch it. It’s pretty.

My four favorite futbol(soccer) books.

When on board H.M.S “Beagle,” as naturalist, I was much struck with certain facts in the distribution of the inhabitants of South America, and in geologic relations of the present to the past inhabitants of that continent.

On the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin.

One of the best opening lines—ever.

bigbennklingon:

Brigitte Bardot

bigbennklingon:

Brigitte Bardot

(via bigbennklingon)

@SN_Baseball: 100 years ago today, Babe Ruth made his @MLB debut. Look at his career in iconic photos - http://t.co/J81hNf44hk  http://t.co/NHmvsrbaKe

@SN_Baseball: 100 years ago today, Babe Ruth made his @MLB debut. Look at his career in iconic photos - http://t.co/J81hNf44hk http://t.co/NHmvsrbaKe

vintageanchorbooks:

atlasobscura:

The Royal Portuguese Cabinet of Reading - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Rising three-stories above the central study area on each wall, the book collection contained in the Royal Portuguese Cabinet of Reading has created one of the most stunning examples of “library porn” on the planet as well as showing the history and breadth of writing that has come out of Portugal.  

The doors of this massive library were opened in 1900, bringing a nearly endless collection of Portuguese texts to readers in the capitol of the empire. The cabinet was founded in the early 1800’s by a trio of Portuguese immigrants who wanted to bring their country’s culture to the Brazilian capitol. The collection’s current home was built in the 1880’s specifically to house their growing collection, and was designed to evoke a Gothic-Renaissance influence that was popular at the time. At 350,000 titles, the collection soon became the largest collection of Portuguese works outside of Portugal itself including rare original manuscripts, singular works of literature, and unique proofs.

Keep reading more about the Royal Portuguese Cabinet of Reading, on Atlas Obscura…

Whoa.

cartoonpolitics:

"I’ll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one." .. (Robert Reich)

cartoonpolitics:

"I’ll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one." .. (Robert Reich)

(via iarrthoireolais)

theparisreview:

Faulkner and Hemingway had a famously snippy rapport—Will was all like, “He has never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary,” and Ernie was all like, “If you have to write the longest sentence in the world to give a book distinction, the next thing you should hire Bill Veek [sic] and use midgets”—which makes Faulkner’s one-paragraph review of The Old Man and the Sea all the more surprising in its candor and courteousness. “Time may show it to be the best single piece of any of us, I mean his and my contemporaries.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

Faulkner and Hemingway had a famously snippy rapport—Will was all like, “He has never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary,” and Ernie was all like, “If you have to write the longest sentence in the world to give a book distinction, the next thing you should hire Bill Veek [sic] and use midgets”—which makes Faulkner’s one-paragraph review of The Old Man and the Sea all the more surprising in its candor and courteousness. “Time may show it to be the best single piece of any of us, I mean his and my contemporaries.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

strandbooks:

It’s a beautiful day for browsing the dollar carts…
muchadoaboutmolly:

Every time I’m in NYC, without fail, I end up buying at least one book at The Strand.

strandbooks:

It’s a beautiful day for browsing the dollar carts…

muchadoaboutmolly:

Every time I’m in NYC, without fail, I end up buying at least one book at The Strand.

My great grandmother turned me onto rock ‘n roll back in 1957. Each day when I returned home from 5th grade at Polk school she had Dick Clark’s American Bandstand on TV. When I heard Chuck Berry and Buddy Holly that sealed the deal. We lived on A Avenue where the St. Luke’s Hospital parking lot is now. That was back in the day when the street was made of bricks.