awesomepeoplereading:

Allen Lane, Penguin founder/holder, reads.
classicpenguin:

blackballoonpublishing:

Penguin Books Founder Allen Lane with a Penguin and, ah, a penguinHappy Birthday, Penguin and Thanks for Inventing the Modern Paperback Book

Thanks blackballoonpublishing! A happy birthday indeed to Mr. Lane!

awesomepeoplereading:

Allen Lane, Penguin founder/holder, reads.

classicpenguin:

blackballoonpublishing:

Penguin Books Founder Allen Lane with a Penguin and, ah, a penguin

Happy Birthday, Penguin and Thanks for Inventing the Modern Paperback Book

Thanks blackballoonpublishing! A happy birthday indeed to Mr. Lane!

During the 60’s, I dropped acid at the LA airport during a long flight delay. The acid was good. Too good. It forced me to seek refuge at a nearby theater where Zeffirelli’s Romeo and Juliet was playing. By the end of the movie I had mellowed. When I arrived in Cedar Rapids, it seemed just another day.

I still adore that movie. My acid days ended a long time ago.

Your digital camera is a subatomic particle detector. It detects photons. — Gene Van Buren, particle physicist, just making me grin. (via chels)

thecultofgenius:

Astonishing quotes!

(via astro-castro)

the-final-sentence:

Final sentences:

"[Outside the tent the hyena made the same strange noise that had awakened her.] But she did not hear him for the beating of her heart." 
— from “The Snows of Kilimanjaro

"In the early morning on the lake sitting on the stern of the boat with his father rowing, he felt quite sure that he would never die." 
— from “Indian Camp

"He wrote on a while longer now and there was no sign that any of it would ever cease returning to him intact." 
— from The Garden of Eden

"After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain." 
— from A Farewell to Arms

[“I feel fine,” she said. “There’s nothing wrong with me.] I feel fine.” 
— from Hills Like White Elephants

"He could feel his heart beating against the pine needle floor of the forest." 
— from For Whom the Bell Tolls

[“Oh, Jake,” Brett said, “we could have had such a damned good time together.”
Ahead was a mounted policeman in khaki directing traffic. He raised his baton. The car slowed suddenly pressing Brett against me.
“Yes,” I said.] “Isn’t it pretty to think so?”
— from The Sun Also Rises

"But this is how Paris was in the early days when we were very poor and very happy."
— from A Moveable Feast

"The old man was dreaming about the lions."
— from The Old Man and the Sea

Sextillion

Sextillion

The war never ends.

theparisreview:

“Breakfast is a personal ritual that can only be properly observed alone, and in a spirit of genuine excess … four Bloody Marys, two grapefruits, a pot of coffee, Rangoon crêpes, a half-pound of either sausage, bacon, or corned-beef hash with diced chilies, a Spanish omelette or eggs Benedict, a quart of milk, a chopped lemon for random seasoning, and something like a slice of key lime pie, two margaritas and six lines of the best cocaine for dessert.” —The breakfast habits of Hunter S. Thompson, born on this day in 1937. (via)

theparisreview:

“Breakfast is a personal ritual that can only be properly observed alone, and in a spirit of genuine excess … four Bloody Marys, two grapefruits, a pot of coffee, Rangoon crêpes, a half-pound of either sausage, bacon, or corned-beef hash with diced chilies, a Spanish omelette or eggs Benedict, a quart of milk, a chopped lemon for random seasoning, and something like a slice of key lime pie, two margaritas and six lines of the best cocaine for dessert.” —The breakfast habits of Hunter S. Thompson, born on this day in 1937. (via)

videogamenostalgia:

Flappy Bird for Apple II Is Now Available

Great news, everbody! If you happen to have both a floppy disk and an Apple II, you can now download Flappy Bird onto either a 3.25” or 5.25” floppy disk and play the game on your Apple II machine. 

Going by the name ‘Flapple Bird,’ the Apple II version of the famous game was dreamed up and created by Dagen Brock

(via newsweek)

Infinitesimal, Amir Alexander.

NYT book review by John Allen Paulos here: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/08/science/infinitesimal-looks-at-an-historic-math-battle.html?_r=0

Infinitesimal, Amir Alexander. NYT book review by John Allen Paulos here: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/08/science/infinitesimal-looks-at-an-historic-math-battle.html?_r=0

libraryjournal:

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published
On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.
Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.
Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.
Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

Happy Publication Day!

libraryjournal:

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published

On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.

Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.

Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.

Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

Happy Publication Day!

Put it all in,
Make use.
— From Raymond Carver’s poem Sunday Night.

It’s the summer of 2014. I’m reading Herodotus. Quite frankly, this is a bit of a shock. I never expected I’d live this long.

I wonder what Herodotus would say if he saw me reading his Histories on my iPhone while drinking beer and whiskey. I think he’d be cool with it.

I wonder what Herodotus would say if he saw me reading his Histories on my iPhone while drinking beer and whiskey. I think he’d be cool with it.

vintageanchorbooks:

Happy Bastille Day!“Asked what he thought of the significance of the French Revolution, the Chinese Premier Zhou En-lai is reported to have answered, ‘It’s too soon to tell.’  Two hundred years may still be too soon (or possibly, too late) to tell.”—from CITIZENS: A Chronicle of the French Revolution by Simon SchamaInstead of the dying Old Regime, Schama presents an ebullient country, vital and inventive, infatuated with novelty and technology—a strikingly fresh view of Louis XVI’s France.

vintageanchorbooks:

Happy Bastille Day!

“Asked what he thought of the significance of the French Revolution, the Chinese Premier Zhou En-lai is reported to have answered, ‘It’s too soon to tell.’  Two hundred years may still be too soon (or possibly, too late) to tell.”
—from CITIZENS: A Chronicle of the French Revolution by Simon Schama

Instead of the dying Old Regime, Schama presents an ebullient country, vital and inventive, infatuated with novelty and technology—a strikingly fresh view of Louis XVI’s France.